They told us that Ukrainian forces had left

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Stanitsa Luganskaya liberated without shots fired

Stanitsa Luganskaya has been liberated from Kiev forces without shots fired.

On February 26, the LPR People’s Militia entered the Stanitsa Luganskaya township on the northern bank of the Severskiy Donets river, that had been under Ukraine’s control since 2014.

Lugansk Media Center editor-in-chief Sergey Meshkovoi arrived in the township early on Saturday, along with People’s Militia service members and other journalists. The military said that they had been informed of Ukrainian withdrawal by locals, who crossed into the LPR in the morning.

“They told us that Ukrainian forces had left,” one of the service members said.

from www.lug-inf.com

Reporters, accompanied by the troops, are excited to be entering a town they have not been able to visit since the war broke out. Many of the Lugansk residents have been separated from their family members in Stanitsa for years. Civilians were allowed to travel across the river through the checkpoints on both sides, but for some people, such as journalists, service members, officials, it was not an option: Ukrainian security service wanted them, accusing of “separatism”.

Finally, Lugansk and Stanitsa residents are no longer separated by the contact line that follows the natural river border in this area.

The locals, first cautious and alert, soon started greeting the LPR soldiers.

“I breathed a sigh of relief, I’m in a great mood,” one of the local women said.

Another one said that she had no idea what is going to happen next, “but it is unlikely to get worse”.

Some drug stores offered water to the newly arrived for free.

Ukrainian flags along the bridge connecting the two banks have been replaced with Republican banners. National symbols of Ukraine have been removed from public buildings in the town centre.

The local administration head Albert Zinchenko, who has been in the office for less than a year, says that the worst happened when the town was taken by nationalistic battalions in 2014.

“They robbed people of everything, took even underwear.”

Then the regular armed forces substituted for them. “It was a bit better,” he says.

Zinchenko is expected to keep the office.

As People’s Militia servicemen advance deeper into the town, more locals greet them, as well as their pets. A grey-and-white cat doesn’t seem to care about politics, but is eager to find out whether the newcomers have some treats.

“You are no longer a kit,” Meshkovoi tells her using a Ukrainian word for cat. “You’re a kot now,” he continues, using a Russian word.

A dog comes by, and an LPR soldier gives him some food.

“LPR dogs must be fat,” he says. *t

LPR militia intercepts Ukrainian army drone, prevents strike at Republic

Military&Defence 

Lugansk People’s Republic militiamen have intercepted a Ukrainian army unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) which Kiev forces planned to use for adjusting mortar fire at the Republic, LPR People’s Militia spokesman Ivan Filiponenko said.

“Today, in violation of Article 1 of the Additional Measures to Strengthen the Ceasefire which bans the use of any unmanned aerial vehicles, the enemy launched a Leleka-100 drone in the Popasnaya settlement area at the order of war criminal (Sergey) Postupalsky, for  reconnaissance and subsequent adjustment of artillery fire from 24th Brigade positions,” Filiponenko said.

The drone can transmit real time images, determine precise coordinates, relay them to a fire control station and record this information, he added.
“Simultaneously, we detected the advancing to fire positions of 24th Brigade on-duty artillery and the alert to standby of a 2nd battalion mortar squad in the Novoalexandrovka settlement,” the spokesman said.

“Thanks to the professionalism of the Republic’s defenders and teamed up air defense and radio electronic warfare units that used a Triton M1 jamming system, the enemy drone was detected in time and force-landed in the Kalinovo-Borschevatoye settlement area,” he said.

This neutralized the threat of an artillery strike, Filiponenko said, adding that “our specialists are examining the videos restored from the drone memory drive.”
The spokesman said that the Nazi symbols were painted on the wings of the intercepted drone.

“We urge the international community and observers to pay special attention not to fake threats or populist statements alleging aggressive plans of the Republics, but to the fact confirmed with hard evidence of the enemy’s using airborne equipment for reconnaissance and fire adjustment, and urge also them to take measures to prevent provocations by Ukraine supported by western supervisors,” Filiponenko said.

The Ukrainian government launched the so-called anti-terrorist operation against Donbass in April 2014.  Conflict settlement relies on the Package of Measures for the Implementation of the Minsk Agreements, signed on February 12, 2015 in the Belorussian capital by the Contact Group members and coordinated by the Normandy Four heads of states (Russia, Germany, France and Ukraine).  The document provides for ceasefire and withdrawal of heavy weapons from the contact line. *i*b

17 soldiers of Ukrainian 57th brigade lay down arms, join LPR side

Military&Defence 

Seventeen Ukrainian armed forces members have laid down their arms and defected to the LPR side, Republican Defence’s spokesman Ivan Filiponenko said.

“More and more Ukrainian rank-and-file soldiers are realizing the meaninglessness and futility of the armed conflict, as they die or become disabled because of their authorities political interests,” Filiponenko said.

“Today, 17 members of the 57th separate motorized brigade voluntarily laid down their arms and joined the LPR side,” he said.

The soldiers were examined by doctors, one of them received the treatment he needed.

Filiponenko told journalists that all the defected soldiers are saved and will be able to return home after the military action is over.

Stanitsa Luganskaya has been liberated from Kiev forces without shots fired.

On February 26, the LPR People’s Militia entered the Stanitsa Luganskaya township on the northern bank of the Severskiy Donets river, that had been under Ukraine’s control since 2014.

Lugansk Media Center editor-in-chief Sergey Meshkovoi arrived in the township early on Saturday, along with People’s Militia service members and other journalists. The military said that they had been informed of Ukrainian withdrawal by locals, who crossed into the LPR in the morning.

“They told us that Ukrainian forces had left,” one of the service members said.

Reporters, accompanied by the troops, are excited to be entering a town they have not been able to visit since the war broke out. Many of the Lugansk residents have been separated from their family members in Stanitsa for years. Civilians were allowed to travel across the river through the checkpoints on both sides, but for some people, such as journalists, service members, officials, it was not an option: Ukrainian security service wanted them, accusing of “separatism”.

Finally, Lugansk and Stanitsa residents are no longer separated by the contact line that follows the natural river border in this area.

The locals, first cautious and alert, soon started greeting the LPR soldiers.

“I breathed a sigh of relief, I’m in a great mood,” one of the local women said.

Another one said that she had no idea what is going to happen next, “but it is unlikely to get worse”.

Some drug stores offered water to the newly arrived for free.

Ukrainian flags along the bridge connecting the two banks have been replaced with Republican banners. National symbols of Ukraine have been removed from public buildings in the town centre.

The local administration head Albert Zinchenko, who has been in the office for less than a year, says that the worst happened when the town was taken by nationalistic battalions in 2014.

“They robbed people of everything, took even underwear.”

Then the regular armed forces substituted for them. “It was a bit better,” he says.

Zinchenko is expected to keep the office.

As People’s Militia servicemen advance deeper into the town, more locals greet them, as well as their pets. A grey-and-white cat doesn’t seem to care about politics, but is eager to find out whether the newcomers have some treats.

“You are no longer a kit,” Meshkovoi tells her using a Ukrainian word for cat. “You’re a kot now,” he continues, using a Russian word.

A dog comes by, and an LPR soldier gives him some food.

“LPR dogs must be fat,” he says. *t

 

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