This is part of a transcript from a document which outlines planning details before lockdown. When Dr Evans says “a good death” he is talking about Euthanasia

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3 Responses to “This is part of a transcript from a document which outlines planning details before lockdown. When Dr Evans says “a good death” he is talking about Euthanasia”

  1. mii says:

    I know for a fact that there has been a shortage of these syringe drivers for the past year. That means thousands of people have not had a so called good death and even worse, their families have suffered more immensely because of this.

  2. Loccie says:

    mii

    That’s an interesting comment, thousands of people dying of what?

    I will tell you what I know for a fact a patient separated from their family, The hospital giving morphine and midazolam until the patient died even though they refused the DNR and said they did not wish this medication administered.

    ‘Official figures show 38,352 out-of-hospital prescriptions for midazolam were issued in April 2020- more than double the February figure.

    The monthly average for the past five years in England was about 15,000.

    An anti-euthanasia campaigner has claimed the spike is evidence that care homes have been putting their residents on end-of-life โ€˜pathwaysโ€™, the MailOnline reports.’

    38,582 is just one months out-of-hospital use it does not include in hospital use. You know they sent all the elderly and infirm people out of hospital and into care homes where doctors visited and put blanket DNR’s on all the residents who were then given the 38,582 doses midazolam until they died because a flow chart deemed them ‘too frail’ to survive covid.

  3. ian says:

    Quite a difficult subject to talk about. Both my parents were euthanised using syringe driven morphine. My father was dying from cancer, and my mother dementia and other factors. No one wants anyone to die in pain, and as morphine in high doses tends to anaesthetise, and food, water, and necessary drugs are withheld, it’s only going one way.

    The difficulty arrises with motive. If it is genuinely in the patient’s best interest, so to speak, then it can be argued for. If on the other hand, it is for ulterior motives, without the patients’ wishes, or at least the wishes of someone with the patient’s interests at heart, surely then it is murder. As I say, not easy.

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