You can put lipstick on a pig, but you can’t hide the smell. Fracking Police.

[fbvideo link=”https://www.facebook.com/eddiethornton/videos/10154745856296481/” width=”500″ height=”400″ onlyvideo=”1″]

VIDEO. No surprises.  Just the blatancy of what they are doing.  Violating a peaceful demonstration.  The Police block the road, then accuse the demonstrators of blocking the road and arrest them.

Great turn out.  Great music.  Singing.  Dance.  Just a lying and noxious Police force arresting people who are committing no crime, as usual working for the fracking companies that pay them. Money is all, but not when thousands of people turn out to stop the wilful destruction of the environment.  The purpose of the corporations is to destroy our water.  Then they can import and sell water to us at a very nice price.  This is to replace the end of the oil business which is coming, with the arrival of electric cars, solar power and other new technologies which spell the end for BP, Shell.  These corporations will kill to get another similar business going where we all have to buy their stuff.

Oil was essential.  water is the basis of life.  They have no right to turn it into a business.  The Police are the corporations’ little stooges, nothing much between the ears, just an ugly tendency to commit illegal acts and exercise violence against innocent people.

You can put lipstick on a pig, but you can’t hide the smell.  Here’s the news from Kirby Misperton yesterday.  Violence form overwhelming numbers of POlice.  (some interference but words are audible)

https://www.facebook.com/ian.r.crane.7/videos/1220484544723916/

This is what we all need to be doing on a Monday morning.

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2 Responses to “You can put lipstick on a pig, but you can’t hide the smell. Fracking Police.”

  1. Gordon says:

    Trouble is most of the police just don’t know the law and hold to the thought that because one is a national or multi national corporation they must be in the right.

    On a daily basis we see miscarriages of justice by not only the police but by magistrates each with their own interpretation of the law often to suite their own personal agenda.

    Isa 59:4 No one brings a lawsuit fairly, and no one goes to law honestly; they have relied on empty arguments and they tell lies; they conceive trouble and give birth to iniquity.

    • Gordon says:

      United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

      In British legislation, an oath taken by a constable in England and Wales or in Northern Ireland is described as an “Attestation” and annotated as such in a relevant Act. In Scotland a constable is required to make a “declaration”.
      England and Wales
      Territorial police constables

      The 43 territorial police forces in England and Wales are responsible for general policing. Members of the police Service are attested under section 29 of the Police Act 1996.[1] This oath is also taken by members of the British Transport Police force and the Ministry of Defence Police. The prescribed form of words is that given by schedule 4 to the Act (inserted by section 83 of the Police Reform Act 2002[2]), as follows:

      English

      I, … of … do solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will well and truly serve the Queen in the office of constable, with fairness, integrity, diligence and impartiality, upholding fundamental human rights and according equal respect to all people; and that I will, to the best of my power, cause the peace to be kept and preserved and prevent all offences against people and property; and that while I continue to hold the said office I will to the best of my skill and knowledge discharge all the duties thereof faithfully according to law.

      Welsh

      Rwyf i…o…yn datgan ac yn cadarnhau yn ddifrifol ac yn ddiffuant y byddaf yn gwasanaethu’r Frenhines yn dda ac yn gywir yn fy swydd o heddwas (heddferch), yn deg, yn onest, yn ddiwyd ac yn ddiduedd, gan gynnal hawliau dynol sylfaenol a chan roddi’r un parch i bob person; ac y byddaf i, hyd eithaf fy ngallu, yn achosi i’r heddwch gael ei gadw a’i ddiogelu ac yn atal pob trosedd yn erbyn pobl ac eiddo; a thra byddaf yn parhau i ddal y swydd ddywededig y byddaf i, hyd eithaf fy sgil a’m gwybodaeth, yn cyflawni’r holl ddyletswyddau sy’n gysylltiedig â hi yn ffyddlon yn unol â’r gyfraith.

      Park constables

      Constables obtaining their powers from the Parks Regulation Act 1872 are required to be “…attested as a constable by making a declaration before a justice of the peace that he will duly execute the office of constable” with no specific words prescribed in the Act. The only constables still attested under this Act are those of Kew Constabulary. The Royal Parks Constabulary, whose officers were formerly attested under this Act, was disbanded in 2003.

      Constables obtaining their powers from the Ministry of Housing and Local Government Provisional Order Confirmation (Greater London Parks and Open Spaces) Act 1967 are required to be attested in accordance with that Act. These include staff employed to protect parks in individual boroughs in Greater London. Examples include the Wandsworth Parks Police and the Hampstead Heath Constabulary.
      Scotland

      Constables in Scotland are required to make the declaration given in s.10 of the Police and Fire Reform (Scotland) Act 2012 on appointment. The declaration must be made before a sheriff or justice of the peace.[3]

      “I, do solemnly, sincerely and truly declare and affirm that I will faithfully discharge the duties of the office of constable with fairness, integrity, diligence and impartiality,and that I will uphold fundamental human rights and accord equal respect to all people, according to law.”

      Prior to the 1st of April 2013 constables in Scotland were required to make a declaration on appointment by s.16 of the Police (Scotland) Act 1967[4] “in such terms as may be prescribed”. The words prescribed by the Police (Scotland) Regulations 2004 were as follows:[5]

      I hereby do solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will faithfully discharge the duties of the office of constable.

      The wording was first given statutory effect under the Police (Scotland) Act 1857 and remained largely similar to that form until replaced by the declaration required by the Police and Fire Reform (Scotland) Act 2012.[6]
      Northern Ireland

      Police officers of the Police Service of Northern Ireland are attested under section 38 of the Police (Northern Ireland) Act 2000. The terms are prescribed by that section, and are as follows:[7]

      I hereby do solemnly and sincerely and truly declare and affirm that I will faithfully discharge the duties of the office of constable, with fairness, integrity, diligence and impartiality, upholding fundamental human rights and according equal respect to all individuals and their traditions and beliefs; and that while I continue to hold the said office I will to the best of my skill and knowledge discharge all the duties thereof according to law.

      Other constables

      Constables and special constables of the British Transport Police are required by sections 24 and 25 of the Railways and Transport Safety Act 2003 to make different attestations/declarations depending on where they are appointed.[8][9] In England & Wales, BTP constables take the same oath as prescribed by the Police Act 1996 for a territorial police constable, and in Scotland make the same declaration that as prescribed under the Police (Scotland) Regulations 2004 for a territorial police constable. The location of the declaration/attestation, and the words used, make no difference to the extent of the constable’s jurisdiction.

      Members of the Ministry of Defence Police are required—as with BTP constables—to take the oath that a territorial police constable would in the country in which they are attested.[10] The same applies to members of the Civil Nuclear Constabulary, though in Scotland they are required to only make a “declaration faithfully to execute the duties of the office of a member of the Civil Nuclear Constabulary”.[11]

      Civilian Security Officers belonging to the Northern Ireland Security Guard Service are attested by a resident magistrate as a Special Constable[12] whilst on duty within Ministry of Defence property.[13]

      Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police_oath#United_Kingdom_of_Great_Britain_and_Northern_Ireland

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