TMR – Thinking Mums’ Revolution

This Group of Revolutionary Mothers Is Helping Save Children from Dangerous Vaccines

Apr 13th, 2013 | By  

I got my long-awaited copy last week. I couldn’t put it down. I cried as I relived so many memories of my grandson Jake’s regression into autism after the rabies vaccine almost seven years ago. Wow. Seven years. I can’t believe it’s been that long. It felt like it was happening all over again while I was reading the stories of other families who went through the same pain. The same heartache. The same panic. The same sense of hopelessness. The same … everything.
Like thousands of other stories about vaccine-injured children who have autism and a myriad of other disorders, many of the kids in TMR’s new book had a lot in common. They were developing normally. Then, everything changed—usually after a vaccine. Their lives came to a screeching halt as they became sick and lost skills they once had. They suffered with painful, sometimes debilitating GI problems and sensory issues. They couldn’t communicate their basic needs. They couldn’t sleep. They couldn’t understand what was happening to them. Why they had to go through so many medical tests and treatments. Why their families were falling apart.
The parents also shared much in common. They suffered too, right along with their kids. They cried for them. For all the things most kids took for granted that their kids couldn’t do. For the complete loss of an even remotely normal life. Like watching their children have play dates. Going to a restaurant—or anywhere—without a meltdown. Or dropping their kids off at school and not being in agony all day wondering if they were going to have a seizure or wander off or be thrown out of school because nobody could deal with their behavior. They watched their spouses and other children suffer as they gave everything they had, including their time, energy, and money, to the sick child. They also suffered guilt. They wished they had not succumbed to their doctors’ pressure to get the vaccines. They wished they had not ignored the nagging doubts, that little voice that told them the vaccines couldn’t be safe.
But they didn’t stay there for long. They did everything possible to bring their kids back. To recover them. They tried therapy after therapy. They found support among other families going through the same thing. They pulled themselves up out of the blackest despair a family could go through and looked forward to the future. To healing their children. To tell others what vaccines did to them. To talk and write about their experiences so they could save other families from their pain. And they never gave up. Because giving up was not an option.
Every time their kids went through a regression, a piece of them died. Every time they took a step forward, no matter how small, they celebrated. They learned to focus on the positive and not dwell on the negative. They found comfort and strength and empowerment through others who were living their lives. They united in the strongest cause in the world. Saving their children.
They started a revolution. No amount of money or power that the pharmaceutical companies or doctors or government agencies or anyone else profiting from vaccines think they have can begin to compete with their cause. Ever.
They are not going away. They are not going to stop until the truth about vaccines comes out and is no longer up for debate. They will never quit.
http://vactruth.com/2013/04/13/thinking-moms-revolution/?utm_source=The+Vaccine+Truth+Newsletter&utm_campaign=2274886616-04_13_2013_revolution&utm_medium=email

ALSO –

Sent in by Chris Jones

Villified and witch hunted by the BBC and mainstream media, the ‘fraudulant hoaxer’ Andrew Wakefield responds. Calmly and rationally…. 

http://www.jabs.org.uk/

(scroll down for his article)

The Tap Blog is a collective of like-minded researchers and writers who’ve joined forces to distribute information and voice opinions avoided by the world’s media.
Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.