Immigration Should Never Be Free

Shane Geronimo.  My girlfriend.  I bid £100,000 to get her  a visa.  So far David Cameron has not replied.

£10,000 to appeal a visa rejection?  David Cameron’s guestimate on how much it costs to process an appeal over a rejected visa sounds a bit out.  Most visas are processed by sub-contracted agencies, which operate fast and cheaply, care little and make plenty of errors.

But why is Cameron approaching this subject from such a bizarre angle?   He is tinkering with the issue, rather than getting to grips with the situation.  Visas a present a great opportunity for the government.

Cameron and Britain are missing out.

The granting of visas should not cost money at all, but make money.

Visas should be charged for, at say £5000 for a working visa per annum, and £100-200,000 for a residence visa. 

This could raise billions, literally.
The numbers to process would fall considerably.
Costs would tumble and income rise. 

Whoever said a visa should be provided free of charge?  If you want to talk money, David Cameron, and I do too, then let’s get on with it. 

I offered to pay £100,000 for my Philippine girlfriend’s visa, and sent the offer in a couple of weeks ago.

So far I have received no reply.  Our initial application was rejected out of hand.  I would not appreciate paying £10,000 to appeal, as that would also be rejected under the current rules.  The rules are pretty inhuman inevitably.  Let money decide who comes in, and us, the people, not EU bureaucracies.

UPDATE –  The US has got the idea only this week.  http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703988304575413011107101860.html?mod=WSJEUROPE_newsreel_business
Thousands of dollars will be charged in visa fees for each immigrant hired in the US.

EXTRACT – Legislation that passed the U.S. Senate late Thursday would significantly increase fees for skilled-worker visas, a move that would deal a financial blow to Indian technology-outsourcing companies that send thousands of employees to the U.S. each year.

The measure, which was attached to a $600 million border-security spending bill that senators passed just before leaving for their August recess, would require all companies with U.S. staff that have more than half their U.S.-based employees on H1-B or L-1 visas to pay thousands of dollars in special new fees for each worker.

Immigration should never be free…unless the country’s short of people for some reason.

The Tap Blog is a collective of like-minded researchers and writers who’ve joined forces to distribute information and voice opinions avoided by the world’s media.
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10 Responses to “Immigration Should Never Be Free”

  1. Anonymous says:

    What’s wrong with English women, too complicated or just the wrong side of thirty to be attracted to you?

    Steve

  2. tapestry says:

    I’ll let you answer that, Steve. I have nothing negative to say about English women at all. I left dating and relationships til later in life as I was focused on business in my young years. Not many English girls of an age to have kids are interested in a 55 year old.

    I lived abroad a long time, and now am coming home, mostly as my half Filipino son likes the UK so much. This lady was his ‘mum’ – I was separated from his real mother and had custody – and I wanted to keep the family together.

    The details are unimportant. What’s happened is that because I chose to live outside the EU, I now can’t arrange my life according to my own preferences, but must be dictated to by EU immigration rules.

  3. Anonymous says:

    I’m not normally rude but I see this older guy younger asian woman thing all the time in Dorset – usually in Waitrose or Sainsburys.

    Had a mate in the SAS and he had a thing for filipino women. The last one took him for everything he had (he was no dummy, either).

    Watch your back mate, that’s all.

    Steve

  4. Anonymous says:

    I’m not normally rude but I see this older guy younger asian woman thing all the time in Dorset – usually in Waitrose or Sainsburys.

    Had a mate in the SAS and he had a thing for filipino women. The last one took him for everything he had (he was no dummy, either).

    Watch your back mate, that’s all.

    Steve

  5. tapestry says:

    I understand that others have their ways of doing things. I first visited the Philippines in 1988 as my uncle was President of Smithkline French (now Glaxo) South East Asia.

    I have had problems with my nervous system on and off all my life, probably originally caused by insecticide sprays on the farm where I grew up in the 1950s and 1960s. and I’ve found over twenty and more years that hot countries suit my condition better, and that added to the slow culture of the Philippines has brought me back to life on two occasions.

    Shane is not one of those kind of girls that meet a squaddie and fleece his salary. She’s an office manager with good organisational skills and is very patient with me and all my health problems.

    There is so much prejudice in this area in the UK that it’s almost impossible to conceive that something wholesome and happy can exist. I understand why, as most British guys who visit Asia spend a week in a brothel on holiday and end up as you would expect, and cannot imagine that you can find people from a poor country with good morals and values.

    I’ve lived in the Philippines four years, and have many old friends there, who have been excellent helping me through tough times. I am able to form my own judgements I would think, after a lifetime of experience of many places and people around the world.

    I would just like a visa so Shane can join me and my son once more. She is very good with children. It costs me a lot to keep a house over there, as well live in the UK, and fly (Business class as I can’t take economy) three or four times a year. Paying £100,000 for a visa would actually save me money!

  6. I’d prefer to decide on a number of visas and then auction them, but this seems like a similar system.

    Of course, being a citizen would get you a citizens dividend, so you’d need to auction!

  7. Anonymous says:

    We are at opposite poles in terms of class. Funny, only the internet or perhaps wartime could see two such different people having a chat.

    For what it’s worth I wish you well with the lady you’ve chosen – and the effects of DDT on your health is understood.

    Since you were open with me I will return the favour. I was born into a poor family, and though I’m only fifty-three I still remember the times when I was hungry as a child. What does that mean?

    Lets just say I have a different view with regards to what is and what isn’t important. The massed ranks of the working class will always defend the nation.

    Please bear that in mind as you fly around the world.

    Steve

  8. tapestry says:

    I have always talked to everyone, internet or no, from working on farms since aged 14.

    I have strayed a long way from the way we was brought up. I don’t view people from a class or a race or nation viewpoint primarily, but whether they are interesting, amusing or of good character, and I have written papers on the subject of various cultural behaviour patterns that I have observed.

    As children, we endured not hunger, but separation from our families – and in my and my brother’s case, exposure to toxic chemicals (Poly Chloro Benzenes in fact) from a very young age. We would both have settled for a few hungry days any time, had we known what the future held!

    If it is the opinion of others that I must live out my years in another form of enforced separation so be it. Britain is being run over by an invasion of immigration, I agree. I would not grant free immigration to anyone, EU or not.

    Each should pay (or their employer or family) for the visa that brings them here with money. That would greatly reduce the numbers coming in, more effectively than anything else, and improve the quality.

    Why go through such complicated procedures and expense of analysing acceptability to come to the UK, using the EU points system, when merely putting a price on it would ensure companies don’t offer jobs to people unless they want them.

    Asylum seekers that are permitted to stay should have the payment attached for future repayment, just like a student loan. We have thrown our country away for nothing.

    I accept your good wishes, but would also like your support for a system of immigration which takes account of humanity. Currently people who are happily married or living together are being separated, as they cannot pass ‘The Test’. In my own life, I feel that an injustice is being committed by the State, removing my choice to partner with whom I choose.

    I will pay whatever price the nation decides. But saying outright that I am not able to choose my own partner, from wherever in the world she comes, because of a system of rules, decided in Brussels by people neither of us will ever meet or hear of, is wrong.

    They are cleverly using the natural anger against free immmigration, which is wrong, to stop all immigration from outside the EU, while permitting criminals and all sorts from within.

  9. tapestry says:

    Each should pay (or their employer or family) for the visa that brings them here with money. That would greatly reduce the numbers coming in, more effectively than anything else, and improve the quality.

    Why go through such complicated procedures and expense of analysing acceptability to come to the UK, using the EU points system, when merely putting a price on it would ensure companies don’t offer jobs to people unless they want them.

    Asylum seekers that are permitted to stay should have the payment attached for future repayment, just like a student loan. We have thrown our country away for nothing.

    I accept your good wishes, but would also like your support for a system of immigration which takes account of humanity. Currently people who are happily married or living together are being separated, as they cannot pass ‘The Test’. In my own life, I feel that an injustice is being committed by the State, removing my choice to partner with whom I choose.

    I will pay whatever price the nation decides. But saying outright that I am not able to choose my own partner, from wherever in the world she comes, because of a system of rules, decided in Brussels by people neither of us will ever meet or hear of, is wrong.

    They are cleverly using the natural anger against free immmigration, which is wrong, to stop all immigration from outside the EU, while permitting criminals and all sorts from within.

  10. Anonymous says:

    Bring her in as a student.
    Colin

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