Conservative Right Wing Seeks Alliance With Labour MPs To Stop Brokeback Coalition

Opposition to AV is simmering away on the Conservative backbenches, while Labour opponents prepare amendments to be proposed.  A LAB/CON alliance between the left and right against the centre is taking shape on changes to the voting system, and could well sink the whole thing.

Next up, nuclear power versus wind farms.  This topic is a long standing hobby horse of Roger Helmer MEP, who is shocked by the inability of anyone to stop the removal of Britain’s energy security in favour of bloody windmills.  These generate pathetic quantities of power at huge cost, while despoiling the countryside, and killing birds.
He’s spotted a similar political trend approaching on energy, to that affecting the chances of AV.  Now that the Blair/Brown hegemony is smashed, their weird polices which were imposed on supine Labour MPs are suddenly coming under review, as if a large stone has been turned over and little insects are rushing around in daylight never seen before.

Labour MPs are noticing that the country is fast running out of reliable electricity supply.  Helmer’s point is why is environmemtalist Energy Minister Huhne’s views on windmills being given priority?  This could be the next occasion that an alliance between Conservative right wingers and Labour MPs sets the policy for the nation, and not the love-in alliance between Cameron and Clegg, the so-called Brokeback Coalition.

He writes –

The Coalition means working together.








By Roger Helmer MEP.
The former Labour government, after years of prevarication, had finally come round to accepting the need for new nuclear capacity – at least to replace old capacity coming to the end of its life, and perhaps to increase the overall contribution of nuclear to the UK’s generating needs.
But today we have Chris Huhne, former Lib-Dem MEP and now, bizarrely, the Energy Secretary in the coalition, telling us that we need more wind power, and insisting there will be no public support for nuclear.
Conservatives who sacrificed their shoe-leather canvassing for Conservative candidates last May did not expect to end up with a green Lib-Dem zealot as Energy Secretary, and they did not do it to see a massive increase in wind farms across our green and pleasant land. Huhne’s policies are untenable, and if he continues in this vein, his job will be untenable too. The phrase “criminally insane” springs to mind. Huhne may not be fiddling while Rome burns, but he is playing children’s games with wind-mills while Britain’s energy security is increasingly jeopardised.
In repeating his insistence that not a penny of public money should go to nuclear, Huhne omits to mention the vast subsidies that go to wind, in the form of Renewable Obligation Certificates – which unfairly bias the market for low-carbon generation in favour of wind and against nuclear.
In case you’ve forgotten the problems with wind, let’s summarise. Ideally we need generating capacity which is continuous and predictable, like coal or gas or nuclear. Tidal power is discontinuous, but it’s at least predictable. Wind is the worst option – neither continuous nor predictable. As some continental countries have found, increasing reliance on intermittent wind creates ultimately insuperable problems of grid management. And distributed generation creates the need for new investment in the Grid of around £10 billion, over and above the cost of wind farms.
Wind requires constant back-up – conventional capacity fired up and ready to go (known as spinning reserve). Maintaining this reserve means higher costs and higher CO2 emissions (and actually new conventional back-up capacity as well) – factors which wind advocates rarely take into account. Indeed they often talk in terms of rated capacity and omit to mention that on-shore wind typically delivers only around a quarter of rated capacity.
The Labour government had ambitious plans for wind, which many industry commentators said were simply unachievable. There isn’t the capacity to build and install new turbines at the rate envisaged. I am not aware that Huhne has addressed this problem.
Even if Huhne’s plan could be achieved, it would saddle the UK with unreliable high-cost electricity, creating a huge competitive disadvantage for the UK compared, say, to France, which is 80% nuclear.
And he forgets the fact that wind-farms despoil our countryside, create well-documented health problems for unfortunate local residents who have these monsters dumped on their doorsteps, reduce property values, and blight communities and homes and lives. What about localism, and our promises to pass more powers to local people? What about the power to say NO to wind farms?

Many people in the Labour Party (including the leader of their MEPs Glenis Willmott) support nuclear power. Most Conservatives I know support nuclear. Maybe Conservative and Labour MPs should have a pact to put nuclear first. Huhne needs to learn that being in coalition doesn’t give him and right to impose his ideological nonsense on the country at large.
comment on political betting
Is Helmer calling for a ConLab pact, now that would be interesting.



Huhne is that a Dutch name, only he does seem to be rather fond of Dikes.

     by coldstone July 26th, 2010 at 8:51 am
I don’t see a ConLab pact, but a situation where MPs form alliances on single issues to override their leaderships’ views.  The new Conservative intake have shown Cameron that their support is conditional by blocking his attempt to neuter the 1922 committee’s role.  Labour MPs too, once they find their voices, are not likely to go back under the ‘stone’ once they’ve seen how they can rebel against their weak leadership with impunity.  It would only take these two situations, on AV and on energy, for a successful rebellion to be held by Labour and Conservative MPs, working together to defeat the coalition, and a new trend in politics would be established.  MPs would take over from party leaderships, and bottom-up democracy would rule once more.
http://the-tap.blogspot.com/2010/07/when-british-right-joins-left-they.html
And 44 Conservative MPs sign EDM chal;lenging AV timetable – http://conservativehome.blogs.com/parliament/2010/07/44-tory-mps-sign-early-day-motion-opposing-coalitions-timetable-for-av-vote-.html

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