Shrewsbury School threatens parent with eviction

Dear Mrs Fox,

Your site is unsafe as you are creating red level radiation of at least 6 volts per metre, possibly as high as 20 Volts per metre.
I am not able to switch off my equipment as I need to know where it is safe for me to walk and drive on your site.
My doctor, Dr “”””” “”””””of “”””””””””” Hospital advises that I keep out of high radiation areas as far as possible, and move quickly through locations which present higher threat.  If I don’t I get headaches and chest pains and have other negative health effects.  I should be able to wear protective clothing which I do as necessary.
The threat includes use of mobile phones by teachers and parents.  Teachers should be switched off when in the presence of the children.
European guidelines state that levels of radiation above mW/m2 100 are not safe for children to be in for long periods.  You are denying the existence of European safety guidelines by stating there is no threat from emf.
If you are not able to accommodate electro highly sensitive people at your school, you should make a statement along those lines.  Also if you are not willing to abide by European safety guidelines regarding children in the classroom and their exposure to radiation, you should confirm this so other parents can be warned.
As you are refusing to even check the radiation in the classrooms, I need to know that my son is safe there, as well as myself.  I would far prefer it if you bought a simple meter and carried out regular checks and recorded your emf radiation levels yourselves.
You are not willing to make a statement as to what you consider acceptable radiation levels to be.  It is not acceptable to merely state that radiation is safe in your opinion, when it is known to cause cancer and children are especially vulnerable.
I see little point in engaging in conversation with individuals at the school when there is no individual willing to appear from behind the GDST (Girls Day School Trust) parapet of standard replies.  These are, for those who know what electro sensitivity means, criminally negligent and could have very serious consequences.
If I get no human response but standard legal letters drafted from within the telecommunications industry, I can reply in kind whenever necessary.  I don’t see any human being taking responsibility for this and that means I cannot hold anyone you mention in regard, which I would prefer.  Life is too precious to be squandered by such gross negligence and lack of care.

Dear Mr Curteis

I am sorry that you feel frustrated that the school, along with other organisations is not appreciative of,  or responding to your concerns.  However I can assure you that we care deeply for the welfare of our pupils and staff and indeed the wider community here at the High School.  We have taken all necessary and reasonable precautions to ensure our site is safe for our pupils and we have thoroughly looked into your concerns.

Your actions yesterday represent a risk to our pupils and upset our members of staff.  Our chief responsibility is to safeguard our pupils thus we cannot allow unauthorised activities by anyone whilst on site, including parents.  The use of your monitor has not been authorised and I reiterate that this should not be used again whilst on our site.

Moreover you are not allowed to wander around our school site unsupervised. If you do persist with these activities despite our request for you to stop, then in line with our safeguarding policy and procedures, we will seek further advice which may lead to you being removed from site.

I hope that this sets out our position clearly.

Best regards

Mrs Fiona Fox

Director Of Operations

Shrewsbury School Prep

Dear Fiona,
The accusations run thick and fast and the threats.  I don’t recognise the details you give, but never mind as that is not the issue here.
I presume that the ban on radiation monitors applies to all parents and so are you going to notify all others of your ruling.
Please also notify the school and the parents whether you intend to abide by the European guidelines on classroom radiation.  I note that that you fail to reply to this important point.
I understand that you are not willing to monitor classroom radiation levels yourselves despite banning others from trying to do so.
I fail to see how this reaches a description of setting high standards of care.  In fact it is the opposite.
If you operate a policy, which includes no tolerance of electro-hyper-sensitive people being able to protect themselves on your site, I think people need to know.  Please give a clear general ruling making this completely clear.
Thank you for letting me know of your position but please answer the questions raised about the European guidelines.  If you won’t abide by these, what standards of radiation will you accept inside the classroom?  You can’t just duck the whole issue and keep on about previous actions.   You haven’t taken any.
I have the measure of you now.
Henry Curteis

Building Biology
Indoor Environment
Checklist©
Edition July 2005

The Building Biology Indoor Environment Checklist© contributes to creating optimal living and work en-
vironments that promote health and well-being for occupants, users and visitors.

Top performance of body and mind as well as optimal regeneration and relaxation require a healthy buil-
ding that is largely free from undesirable environmental stressors.

The Building Biology Indoor Environment Checklist© is based on the current Standard of Building Biolo-
gy Testing Methods (SBM-20031

), making possible the verifi cation of environmental stressors through recog-
nized testing methods. For the interpretation of test results, we recommend the Building Biology Guidelines

for Sleeping Areas of the SBM-20031
.

This checklist is created – to the best of our knowledge – as a tool for preventive health protection. We do

not want to, nor can we, make any claim as to the completeness of the presented information not least becau-
se of the multitude of possibilities involved. This checklist is meant to provide initial guidance and encourage

action towards healthy building. For in-depth advice on detailed questions and the implementation of solution
options, consult a qualifi ed building biology consultant.

The Building Biology Indoor Environment Checklist© serves as a guideline, which can be used in the plan-
ning and design stages of a new project as well as for existing buildings. The focus is on areas for long-term

use, especially sleeping areas, resting spaces, classrooms and workplaces.
This Building Biology Indoor Environment Checklist© covers the following parameters according to the
classifi cation of the SBM-20031
:
– A 1 AC Electric Fields (ELF)
– A 2 AC Magnetic Fields (ELF)
– A 3 Radiofrequency Radiation (Electromagnetic Waves)
– A 4 Static Electric Fields (DC)
– A 5 Static Magnetic Fields (DC)

It is our intention to continue updating this checklist and also to develop recommendations for other para-
meters of the Standard of Building Biology Testing Methods.

The checklist was created by an interdisciplinary workgroup:
© Dr. Gerd Oberfeld (Landessanitätsdirektion Salzburg), Dr. Martin H. Virnich (VDB)
Dr. Dietrich Moldan (VDB), Martin Schauer (VDB), Uwe Münzenberg (VDB), July 2005
Translation by Katharina Gustavs, Canada.
Please forward any suggestions regarding this checklist to: gerd.oberfeld@salzburg.gv.at

1
The Standard of Building Biology Testing Methods (SBM-2003) and the corresponding Building Biology Guidelines for Sleeping
Areas of the SBM-2003 can be found at: http://www.baubiologie.de/site/downloads/english/SBM2003_engl_neu.pdf

Building Biology Indoor Environment Checklist© – Edition July 2005 Page 2
www.baubiologie.net/docs/elektrosmog _ bb _ indoor _ environment _ checklist.pdf
A 1 AC Electric Fields (ELF)
Unfavorable Conditions Solution Options
Unshielded (conventional) electric wiring. Use electrically shielded wiring.

Provide a demand switch for sleeping areas. Prior to in-
stallation, always have its effectiveness checked by po-
tential-free measurements of the AC electric fi eld. De-
pending on the wiring layout, the installation of a de-
mand switch could also increase the electric-fi eld ex-
posure!

Unshielded electrical boxes. Use shielded electrical boxes.

Unshielded connection cables with three-pin plug. Use shielded connection cables, e.g. for computers, mo-
nitors, printers, scanners, consumer electronics de-
vices, etc.

Devices with unshielded connection cables and Euro-
pean fl at plugs.

Keep distance (e.g. place on a second table) and af-
ter use disconnect both poles directly at the outlet (e.g.

with a switchable outlet or a disconnection switch).

Unshielded lamps and extension cords with
three-pin plug.

Use shielded lamps such as desk lamps, bedside lamps,
dining table lamps, fl oor lamps and ceiling lamps with
appropriate shielded cords.

Fluorescent lamps and compact fl uorescent lamps such
as energy saving lamps.

Avoid exposure to any type of fl uorescent lamp below

1 to 2 m (3 to 6’) distance. More favorable are „nor-
mal“ incandescent lamps with grounded metal socket

and shade as well as line-voltage halogen lamps (Euro-
pe: 230 V; North America: 120 V) with grounded me-
tal shade.

Unshielded extension cords. Shielded extension cords.
Unshielded power outlet strips. Shielded power outlet strips.
Ungrounded aluminum vapor barrier in occupied attic. Have aluminum vapor barriers grounded by a licensed
electrician if a reduction of the electric fi eld can be

achieved (check beforehand with potential-free measu-
rements)

Electrically heated waterbeds. Have the electric-fi eld exposure tested. In case of an
elevated exposure, only heat waterbed during the day

and unplug during sleep (only switching off is often in-
suffi cient).

Electric blankets. Preheat bed with electric blanket, but unplug during
sleep (only switching off is often insuffi cient).

Computer monitors, laptops, printers, copiers, fax ma-
chines.

Use devices with TCO certifi cation (www.tcodevelop-
ment.com).

High-emission photovoltaic systems (due to the
inverter’s generation of extensive 50/60 Hz AC electric
fi elds that are emitted from the PV modules).

The problem of photovoltaic systems with electronic
inverters often consists in the photovoltaic modules
“picking up” the 230 / 120 AC voltage and spreading
the associated AC electric fi elds across large areas.
Therefore use repercussion-free (ultra-clean) inverters

whose AC voltage cannot backfeed into the PV modu-
les; in addition sensitive areas for long-term use should

be located away from PV modules, inverter and cables.
Specify the quality requirements prior to the allocation
of the contract.

Building Biology Indoor Environment Checklist© – Edition July 2005 Page 3
www.baubiologie.net/docs/elektrosmog _ bb _ indoor _ environment _ checklist.pdf
A 2 AC Magnetic Fields (ELF)
Unfavorable Conditions Solution Options
Net/stray currents on grounding conductors, ground
bus bars, metal water piping, gas piping, etc.

Install a TN-S power system, strictly separating the
grounding and the neutral conductor throughout the
entire installation; only one single bond at the main
ground bus bar.

Net/stray currents on shielding of data cables (LAN ca-
ble).

Verifi ed by measurements, ground shielding on one
side only, e.g. use patch cable without a metal jack at
the computer end.
Install a TN-S power system, strictly separating the
grounding and the neutral conductor throughout the
entire installation; only one single bond at the main
ground bus bar.

Asymmetrical load distribution. In three-phase systems, have a licensed electrician ba-
lance the phases in such a way that a largely symmetri-
cal load distribution is achieved.

Net/stray currents that enter the building along me-
tal components (Europe: 50 Hz/North America 60

Hz from the electric power distribution system or
16 2/3 Hz from the railway system).

Install a dielectric coupling (electrically insulating pi-
ece) after having it checked by a licensed electrician.

In some instances all electrically conductive piping and

systems including shielding of cables should be con-
nected where entering the building, i.e. an equipotenti-
al bonding is carried out right there.

Currents with harmonics

(resulting in fi eld emissions with frequencies well abo-
ve 50/60 Hz).

Avoid nonlinear electronic devices such as energy sa-
ving lamps, electronic ballasts (for fl uorescent lamps),

dimmer switches, mains adaptors.
Reduce the number of electronic devices by choosing

multifunction devices (e.g. printer, fax machine, scan-
ner and copier in one device).

Generous sizing of the cross section of neutral conduc-
tors.

Rest/sleeping areas or workplaces in the immediate vi-
cinity of the feeder cable to the building, service meter,

main panel and distribution cables of electric circuits.

Keep suffi cient distance to feeder cables to the buil-
ding, service meters, main panels and distribution ca-
bles of electric circuits. If in doubt, have it checked by

an expert.
Nearby overhead and underground high-tension power
lines.

Keep suffi cient distance to overhead or underground
high-tension power lines (record data of long-term

measurements or measure at a time of known load con-
ditions and calculate to thermal threshold current).

Railway systems and stray currents of railway systems. Keep suffi cient distance to the railway system and eli-
minate stray currents; e.g. by using piping made from

electrically insulating materials or a dielectric coupling
(electrically insulating piece).
In some instances all electrically conductive piping and

systems including shielding of cables should be con-
nected where entering the building, i.e. an equipotenti-
al bonding is carried out right there.

Transformer stations and substations (including pole-
mounted/ground-mounted transformers).

Keep suffi cient distance to transformers and especial-
ly to secondary distribution power lines (record data

of long-term measurements or measure at a time of

known load conditions and calculate to thermal thres-
hold current).

Building Biology Indoor Environment Checklist© – Edition July 2005 Page 4
www.baubiologie.net/docs/elektrosmog _ bb _ indoor _ environment _ checklist.pdf
Unfavorable Conditions Solution Options
Single-phase electric motors such as:
– Compressor refrigeration units
– Aquarium pumps
– Electric clocks (e.g. in electric stoves or as timer)
– Machine motors

Keep suffi cient distance and/or use absorber refrigera-
tion units instead of compressor units.

Small transformers (lamp transformers, clock radios,
CD players, rechargers, electric typewriters, electric
calculators, etc.).

Keep suffi cient distance.

High-emission low-voltage halogen lamps (12 V), in-
stalled as rope lighting with large distance between

supply and return cable.

If low-voltage halogen lamps are required, choose track

lighting installation with a short distance between sup-
ply and return cable; better are installations with line-
voltage halogen lamps (230 / 120 V).

Computer monitors, laptops, printers, copiers, fax ma-
chines.

Use devices with TCO certifi cation (www.tcodevelop-
ment.com).

High-emission headsets and telephone receivers. Use low-emission headsets and telephone receivers
(e.g. shielded or based on piezo technology).

A 3 Radiofrequency Radiation (Electromagnetic Waves)
Unfavorable Conditions Solution Options
Relevant emissions from mobile phone base stations
(GSM, GPRS, PCS, US Cellular, UMTS, cdmaOne,
CDMA 2000, TETRA).

At the source: „Mobile Phone Network Light“. Provide
evidence for low RF exposure by calculation including

visualization, e.g. with NIRView software (www.nir-
view.com), and measurement. At the moment there are

no legal requirements to minimize emissions, rather on
a voluntary basis.
At the building: Installation of RF attenuating building
and shielding materials.

DECT cordless phones (2.4-GHz/5.8-GHz)
(base stations constantly emit pulsed radiation).

Use corded phones.

If cordless phone technology is necessary, choose non-
pulsed cordless phone technologies: CT1 (in Aus-
tria), CT1+ (in Germany and Switzerland) or analog

800/900 MHz without DSS (North America); keep

cordless phone calls as short and infrequent as possib-
le.

WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network; access points

and client devices, searching for an – often non-exis-
tent – access point, are permanent transmitters of

pulsed RF radiation).

WLAN is not recommended. Instead use wired
internet access (modem, ISDN, DSL).

If WLAN technology is indispensable, always turn ac-
cess points and client devices off when not in use.

Bluetooth applications. Do not use Bluetooth applications.

If technically necessary, choose devices with the lo-
west possible power output, e.g. 1 mW (class 3) or

2.5 mW (class 2); avoid 100 mW power output (class 1).
When not in use, turn off.

Mobile phones (GSM, GPRS, PCS, US Cellular,
UMTS, cdmaOne, CDMA 2000).

Use landlines.
Corded phones for undisturbed conversations should
also be provided in public areas.
If needed, use mobile phones for important and urgent
short calls or SMS only.

Building Biology Indoor Environment Checklist© – Edition July 2005 Page 5
www.baubiologie.net/docs/elektrosmog _ bb _ indoor _ environment _ checklist.pdf
Unfavorable Conditions Solution Options
Relevant emissions from radio, TV and radar stations,
etc.

At the building: Use RF attenuating building and shiel-
ding materials.

Microwave ovens. Do not use microwave ovens.

If necessary, be aware of radiation leakage: Keep 1 to
2 m distance while operating.

Wireless baby monitors and cameras, especially with
DECT standard.

Do not install wireless baby monitors; instead choose
devices that use the corded telephone network or plug
into a power outlet (powerline communication).
Use baby monitors based on sound only (i.e. activated
by noise only).

Computer monitors, laptops, printers, copiers and fax
machines.

Use devices with TCO certifi cation
(www.tcodevelopment.com).

Wireless computer mice and keyboards. Use corded computer mice and keyboards.
A 4 Static Electric Fields (DC)
Unfavorable Conditions Solution Options

Synthetic carpets / wall-to-wall carpeting. Carpets from plant-based natural fi bers without insu-
lating backings and without biocides or mothproofi ng

agents.

Synthetic drapes. Drapes from plant-based natural fi bers (e.g. cotton, li-
nen). Animal fi bers (wool, silk) may become electro-
statically charged.

For regulated occupancies (more stringent fi re safety
regulations) drapes from Trevira CS can be an option
(www.treviracs.de).

Synthetic wallpapers (e.g. vinyl). Wallpapers made from natural materials (e.g. cellulo-
se, cotton).

Varnish (petroleum-based) or synthetic surfaces. Natural fi nishes and surfaces (e.g. wood, natural stone,

silicate paint).
Plastic casters under offi ce chairs. Antistatic casters.
Stuffed animals with synthetic furs. Materials that cannot become electrostatically charged.
Relative air humidity < 40 %. Relative air humidity 40 % to 60 %.

A 5 Static Magnetic Fields (DC)
Unfavorable Conditions Solution Options

Magnetized steel in beds such as metal brackets for ad-
justable head/footboards, metal grills, metal bed frame.

Wood

(if necessary small aluminum or stainless steel brack-
ets can be used)

Magnetized steel in mattresses such as coil springs. Metal-free mattresses from natural materials: Pure

natural latex, kapok, horsehair.

Magnetized steel trusses and steel reinforcement in
concrete.

Keep suffi cient distance to areas for long-term use or
demagnetize.

Magnetized steel radiators, steel frames and doors,
steel bathtubs, steel tanks.

Keep suffi cient distance to areas for long-term use or
demagnetize.

Magnetized steel desks. Use wood instead or demagnetize.

 

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