Was Trump’s Scottish mother really a domestic worker?

The above picture of Trump’s mother was taken by an expensive camera with excellent lighting with classy make-up, very good quality for 1930.  Nice clothes too.  She doesn’t look poor anyhow, as they continually insinuate into the narrative, for some reason.

There are many clues that she was not dirt poor at all.  One clue as to her real origins is that Wikipedia states, ‘MacLeod died a year later on August 7, 2000 at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, New York, at age 88′.

Also curious is –

‘Though the 1940 U.S. Census form filed by Mary Anne and Fred Trump stated that she was a naturalized citizen, her naturalization did not actually take place until March 10, 1942.[6][7][8] However, there is no evidence to suggest that she was in violation of any immigration laws (TAP – ahem) at any time prior to her naturalization in 1942, as she frequently traveled internationally but was able to re-enter the U.S. afterwards.[9]’

That suggests some kind of connections, strange goings-on, something being hidden.  There might be more chapters in her story as yet untold.

The narrative of her arrival in America in Wikipedia is as follows –

Mary Anne MacLeod may have first visited the United States for a short stay in December 1929.

TAP – May have?  Did she or didn’t she?  She was born May 1912 so was 17 in 1929.  How would a poor domestic worker aged 17 get the money to go to America twice in six months on a classy Cunard liner?

Then, according to the Scottish newspaper The National, MacLeod was issued immigration visa number 26698 at Glasgow on February 17, 1930. On May 2, 1930, MacLeod departed Glasgow on board the RMS Transylvania arriving in New York City on May 11, 1930‍—‌one day after her 18th birthday, declaring she intended to become a U.S. citizen and would be staying permanently in America.[6][7][8]

In doing so she became what would later be termed an economic migrant, one of tens of thousands of young Scots who left for the United States or Canada during this period, the isle having suffered badly the consequences of World War I and the Clearances before that.[4][5] The Alien Passenger list of the Transylvania, May 2, 1930, lists her as being 5 feet 8 inches (1.73 m) tall, with blue eyes, and occupation as a domestic.[10][2]

TAP – Why did the domestic servant choose the flashiest ship crossing the Atlantic in her day, and have the money to go twice?  Must be an exceptionally well paid domestic servant!

The ship.

Transylvania was built in Glasgow, Scotland, by the Fairfield company, Yard No. 595. She was 552 feet (168 m) long and 70.2 feet (21.4 m) wide. The liner had twin propellers with a service speed of 15.5 knots (28.7 km/h; 17.8 mph). Transylvania had three funnels but only required one; three funnels were more visually appealing and attracted more passengers than her similar-looking fleetmates which only had one funnel each.

Transylvania was completed on 2 September 1925, and sailed from Glasgow to New York on her maiden voyage 10 days later. Transylvania could carry 279 in First Class, 344 in Second Class and 800 in Third Class.

TAP – Marie Ann already had a married sister in New York.  A poor family managed to export two daughters to marry wealthy men in NY.  Long Island is not a poor area. (In fact she already had three sisters in NY- see below. )

Arriving in America with just $50 (equivalent to $732 in 2017), MacLeod lived with her older sister Christina Matheson on Long Island and worked as a domestic servant for at least four years.[6][7][8] One of these jobs appears to have been as a nanny for a well-to-do family in a New York suburb, but the position was eliminated due to economic difficulties caused by the Great Depression.[4] As one account has put it, she “started life in America as a dirt-poor servant escaping the even worse poverty of her native land.”[7]

TAP – They’re making it all up.  A nanny is not a domestic servant.  A domestic servant is not a nanny.  Two lies.  What was her actual profession?  Your guess is as good as mine….but it seems whatever it was needed covering up.   Putting herself on the market meaning the marriage market would seem a likely notion.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Anne_MacLeod_Trump

Actually she had three sisters in America in 1930….according to The National Scot –

Her arrival in New York was also the direct result of a scandal that struck her family at home – the sister who hosted her in New York, Mrs Catherine Reid, gave birth out of wedlock in Scotland in 1920.

TAP – So there were some serious connections and money in place if they could send a daughter in such a condition and have her married overseas.

MaryAnne (sic) had two other sisters resident in the USA at the time, Mrs Christina Matheson and Mrs Mary Joan Pauley, but it was to Catherine’s home in Long Island that she made her way, not for a holiday but as a base to find work.  (TAP – I’m almost convinced not….)

TAP – Who are the MacLeods of Lewis anyway?  Hardly the servant girl type you might say.  More like the Royalty of the Hebrides.

Clan MacLeod of The Lewes, commonly known as Clan MacLeod of Lewis, is a Highland Scottish clan, which at its height held extensive lands in the Western Isles and west coast of Scotland. From the 14th century up until the beginning of the 17th century there were two branches of Macleods: the MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris (Clan MacLeod); and the Macleods of Lewis. In Gaelic the Macleods of Lewis were known as Sìol Thorcaill (“Seed of Torquil”), and the MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris were known as Sìol Thormoid (“Seed of Tormod”).[2]

TAP –   Siol = seed.  Thor = from.  Caill = I’m seeing Gaythel(os), the origin of the word Gaelic, and the original Egyptian Royal family that founded Scotland.

The traditional progenitor of the MacLeods was Leod, whom, a now discredited tradition, made a son of Olaf the Black, King of Mann and the Isles.

TAP – The Kings Of Mann were indeed the descendants of the original Egyptian Royals who settled Ireland and Scotland (descendants of Queen Scota and King Gaythelos and their son Hiber).  Later the Kings Of Mann became Earls of Derby, the Stanleys, the Ridleys (Nicholas Ridley, Matt Ridley).  They put the Tudors on the British throne and were the richest family throughout British history.  Of course any such connections will be denied.  (The latest version of British royalty is Rothschild, usurpers of the original Egyptian royal power).

Today, Clan MacLeod of The Lewes, Clan Macleod of Raasay, and Clan Macleod are represented by “Associated Clan MacLeod Societies”, and the chiefs of the three clans.[3] The association is made up of ten national societies across the world including: Australia, Canada, England, France, Germany, New Zealand, Scotland, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United States of America.

TAP – These are bloodline families.

Scottish aristocracy descends directly from the Hyksos of Lower Egypt (See Ralph Ellis’ ‘Queen Scota’/ also The Scotichronicon), and the Hyksos (speaking Hebrew) of the Ebro (Nile Delta) were the Israelites or the Jews (capital city Avaris, central bank The White House) you get some kind of hint as to who Donald Trump’s mother actually was.  They are crypto-Jews, like so many other supposedly Scottish, Irish and other aristocratic Celtic families – Kennedys another.  The notion that Trump made his money from supplying gold rush miners with ‘services’ might appeal to voters, but it is very likely he married an aristocratic lady, a story he needs to cover up.  The name passes with the father, but the connection to Jewish inheritance is always via the mother.  Maybe she was not cash-rich but she was able to draw on inheritance and trust funds if she married well.  The Trumps seem to have been good enough to get backing from the bloodline families.

Of course she might have helped make the beds and look after her cousins while she waited for Mr Right to call….like a good Auntie would.  Either way this ‘domestic servant’ tale seems to be a plateful of New York baloney.

 

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