Remembering Dave McGowan

mcgowan1
Dave McGowan: A Great Man, Taken From Us.

By Patrick Murphy http://memoryholeblog.com/2015/11/24/a-great-man-taken-from-us/
[The following are the opinions of the author, a longtime commenter at MHB. There is at best only circumstantial evidence that Dave McGowan’s cancer stemmed from a plot by the US government or any other specific entity. McGowan was a longtime smoker whose employment also put him on contact with carcinogenic material, and whose cancer had reached an advanced stage by the time he sought professional treatment.-JFT]

A great loss occurred November 22 at 12:47 PM in Los Angeles: Dave McGowan, the courageous, fearless, brilliant discoverer of patterns no one else noticed, died.

A man who had essentially never had anything physically wrong with him, he all at once came down with cancer, all through his body. Within a few months, he was down to 90 pounds, and the pain could not be managed with drugs. I believe he was murdered, just as I believe that Andrew Breitbart was murdered, and for the same reason.

mcgowan1The crafters of the New World Order are ruthless. Apparently, the decree that Amazon vaporize James Fetzer’s latest edited volume came from the White House. Dinesh D’Souza produced two incredibly damning documentaries exposing the truth about Barry Soetoro, and because he had the misfortune of finding a vast audience, the secret government set about finding a triviality by which his life could be ruined. They even put him in a federal prison camp for the better part of a year (at least they didn’t kill him).

The viciousness of the technique used in Dave’s case is almost unspeakably cruel.

He had decided to publish his last book, about Laurel Canyon, conventionally, with a view of reaching a larger audience than he had with his previous works, and the publisher prevailed upon him to promote it through Facebook. He had not blogged before, and took to it like a fish to water, making thousands of genuine friends. Reading the heartfelt sorrow of the many comments after he revealed his new situation, one was astounded by the power of this new technology to gather a true community from all over the world. The people who wrote to tell him how sorry they were genuinely loved him, and were terribly grateful for what he, via his work, had done for them.

Many offered advice as to how he should approach the battle. Lots of alternative cancer cures, and lots of admonitions to refuse the chemo route. The medical world prevailed, alas, with the fear of how fast-spreading and deadly is the kind of cancer that had hit him so suddenly.

Even with the sickness the rounds of chemo caused him, he was able to compose another essay in his latest project, finding what really happened with Lincoln’s assassination–and reading it, you’d never know anything was now different about him. His mind, and his wit, and his amazing ability to see things there in plain sight that no one ever noticed before, were undiminished. Heartened by this, I continued to drop by his site every morning, in the hopes that the MDs might actually accomplish what they told him they could do: heal him through their allopathic paradigm.

I never wrote at his Facebook page to tell him how sorry I was, because so many people already did so, saying the very things I would have said. How many thousands of his fans can say the same?

He will be missed in a way that few writers are missed when they shuffle off this mortal coil.

Dave’s web site started out as an on-line newsletter. It availed him of the chance to spell out his thoughts about the events of the day, and although I never knew him, I suspect that he learned to write, and think, so beautifully because of it. He finally had the platform he needed to find his true calling.

His early books, as I recall from radio interviews of his that I caught, were complications of those newsletters. Understanding the F-Word was about the strange form of fascism America has so easily come to embrace (while that one DOES reside on my shelf, it remains unread by me, sad to say).

Programmed to Kill, which is about the strange and unexpected reality behind the phenomenon of serial killers, is one I wish I DID NOT read. It is replete with documentation of the pederasty the elites who rule this time of the world seem so addicted to, the world that John DeCamp documented in The Franklin Coverup. It is such a heartbreaking reality, that even Dave, in a radio interview, said that once these ideas are deposited into your brain, they can’t be expunged, and he wondered at whether it was worth it. I talked about this once with Sofia, mentioning a particularly horrible anecdote about the Bohemian Grove. The story I was relating to her was how I felt so horrified to have learned this thing, and I called Stan Monteith to hopefully somehow calm me down. It was his wife, Barbara, who answered the phone, and she was very comforting. Sofia knew the anecdote, and understood my horror. Sofia is stronger than I, and even though years had passed since my chat with Barbara, Sofia’s way was very helpful, too. Still, I wish I did not know these things.

Dave faced such things with a courage I don’t think I could. He soldiered on, facing monsters, and laughing at them, one after another. What he wrote about what he learned exists, as documents we all could face. Some of it very dark indeed, some of it laughable charlatanism. Somehow, he could balance the two worlds.

Eventually, his site was not a platform for his newsletters any longer, but a place he could work out the research he was doing in a more systematic way. If you go there, you can see that gradual transition. The bottom of the page features a sampling of his newsletters (all–well, most– are fantastic reads), and just above that, you will find a blocked off selection of his 9/11-related newsletters–a different method. He was a great, early 9/11 researcher, as those entries will demonstrate. But he also engaged in quite an amusingly antagonistic, public, tête-à-tête with the pompous blowhard Michael Ruppert–but it can only be found in the newsletters not included in the 9/11 section. Believe me, it’s worth the digging to plough through the newsletters and read what transpired between these two men. It’s 9/11 related, but not an analysis of what transpired that morning. It’s about the weirdness of 9/11 research, and how personalities often took center stage.

His analysis of the photographic evidence of what transpired at the Boston Bombing, in 16 parts, is as good as anyone has done. He absolutely PROVES it was a hoax. And he makes you laugh, too, as he does it.

Of course, he became famous on a scale even he was shocked by with the series of articles he called Inside the LC: The strange but Mostly True Story of Laurel Canyon and the Birth of the Hippie Generation. It started out in the most innocuous way possible. One of his daughters had given him a present, a book about one of his favorite things, the rock music of the 60s, and he took it on vacation to read as a diversion. But it was filled with what for him were obvious “red flags,” indicating a lot that needed to be looked into. So he did. 21 Web essays later, he published it as a book, Weird Scenes Inside the Canyon, which I mentioned earlier. It is probably what he will be most remembered by.

(He took down the articles on the Web, as I mentioned in an earlier piece here at MHB, which I found sad, because they included lots of fantastic pictures, but you can still find them all here. The book is a re-crafted version of the web series; Dave said that it had 30% more material, but he also dropped lots of fun stuff. That’s what you have to do when making a book. So it’s great to have both accessible to us. Read both. Dave was a great writer, a great thinker.)

But meanwhile, in the midst of the investigation of the birth of the “hippie” phenomenon, he stumbled upon something else. He called that series of essays Wagging the Moondoggie. Here’s how he launched it:

“It is commonly believed that man will fly directly from the earth to the moon, but to do this, we would require a vehicle of such gigantic proportions that it would prove an economic impossibility. It would have to develop sufficient speed to penetrate the atmosphere and overcome the earth’s gravity and, having traveled all the way to the moon, it must still have enough fuel to land safely and make the return trip to earth. Furthermore, in order to give the expedition a margin of safety, we would not use one ship alone, but a minimum of three … each rocket ship would be taller than New York’s Empire State Building [almost ¼ mile high] and weigh about ten times the tonnage of the Queen Mary, or some 800,000 tons.”

Wernher von Braun, the father of the Apollo space program, writing in Conquest of the Moon

I can see all of you scratching your heads out there and I know exactly what it is that you are thinking: “Why the hell are we taking this detour to the Moon? What happened to Laurel Canyon? Have you completely lost your mind?”

*Sigh*

Back to me, Patrick.

It the best introduction to the Apollo program hoax. The best.

And finally, he became interested in Why Everything You Think You Know About the Lincoln Assassination is Wrong. It is fantastic as anything else he did, even though he was not able to complete the project. Better. He was getting better. How good would he have gotten, given another few decades?

I loved listening to him talk, in interviews. Listen to his one with Sofia. You have to love the guy.

I could go on. I am heartbroken.

My best to his family.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

4 Responses to “Remembering Dave McGowan”

  1. ian says:

    Sounds like my kind of writer. Unfortunately I never encountered him. I’ll look for his material now. They killed Joe Vialls too.

    • ian says:

      I’ve had a look Jennifer and it’s good. Even the first article I read re’ Laural Canyon, a place that touches my youth , as I was in love with the San Francisco hipply culture back in the late 60’s. It makes sense that it was controlled, to draw nuisance people away as they were disrupting the making of war and money. Certainly I’m going to read more.

      • Jennifer says:

        Yes, he is very good. I think some of the Laurel Canyon articles were taken down when he published his book – you can use the Wayback Machine to find the original pages (just put Laurel Canyon/ Dave McGowan/Wayback Machine into a good search engine – I’m using Bing quite a lot, I’m refusing to use ‘G’).

      • ian says:

        I use Bing too Jennifer, even then on the morning after the recent French event, it was playing silly buggers. I will go into it further, it’s very interesting.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.