Who was William Shakespeare?

14._benedict_cumberbatch_hamlet_in_hamlet_at_the_barbican_theatre._photo_credit_johan_persson

I went to the watch Benedict Cumberbatch’s Hamlet last night, filmed at The Barbican Theatre.  Good drama, and a reminder of schooldays when I last read the play.  It’s interesting we still don’t know the real identity of William Shakespeare.  I noted he clearly had knowledge of Satanic Cults.

Tis now the very witching time of night, 
When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out
Contagion to this world: now could I drink hot blood,
And do such bitter business as the day
Would quake to look on.

Perhaps some Tap Bloggers have thoughts on this topic.

The movie ended with Cumberbatch making an appeal on behalf of Syrian refugees, demonstrating in his vivid description, that hell is still breathing out its contagion.  It was as if Hamlet had been captured by the politico-military agenda – as has everything else.  Satan is working his way to fomenting war all over the world, and the theatre’s as good a place to do that as anywhere else.  (One theatre from another as it were)

Jennifer adds –

I’m afraid I studied Elizabethan drama quite seriously at one time, and was certain it was the ‘Swan of Avon’ who wrote the plays. But as you’ve just seen Hamlet, Tap, you may recall the ‘What a piece of work is man’ speech – which sounds very similar to the Neoplatonist Pico Della Mirandola’s ‘Oration on the Dignity of Man’. This is very advanced Hermetic philosophy for a humble actor.
And there again in The Taming of the Shrew, there is clear knowledge of trauma-based mind control, such as would have been used by the elites in their ‘Imperial Conditioning’. Again not something that be commonly known around the South Bank. Yes, he was in the King’s Company of actors, but that only means he was essentially a servant.
And the Sonnets were clearly written by a nobleman. It’s got to be Sir Francis Bacon.
Only you can’t say that around here, because there’s too much business invested in the town, and in academia, – and I used to work at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre!

 

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7 Responses to “Who was William Shakespeare?”

  1. NPP says:

    Again on BBC Question Time last night they position the issue either pro or anti immigration – they fail to acknowledge it is not simply a pro or anti issue, but a numbers issue initiated by our/UK/US/NATO attempt to remove Assad. They fail to analyse the creation of a superstate with watered down national and cultural identity.

    Sounds like you should have given Cumberbatch a damn good heckle TAP. Oh, it was a movie? Oh well, no heckle there then.

    Shakespeare? Goodness knows. I do know there are theories the mainstream do not seem to touch and the official line is of course William was real silly.

    I heard the Withnail & I director Bruce Robinson interviewed on the radio – he said he has dismissed all the other theories after years of research…
    http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/oct/03/they-all-love-jack-busting-ripper-bruce-robinson-review-withnail-i

    “No book about Jack the Ripper would be complete without a new prime suspect, and Robinson’s doesn’t disappoint. Step forward Michael Maybrick, a famous songwriter. Working under the name Stephen Adams, he released 50 songs in the 1880s, including such hits as “The Midshipmite” and “They All Love Jack”. Maybrick became masonic grand organist in 1889, a position previously held by Sir Arthur Sullivan.

    A bachelor who preferred male company, he was good-looking, talented, intelligent, successful and wealthy: ….”

    So, it wasn’t Royalty then.

    Anyway, good morning. Here goes another glorious day in the world of make believe.

  2. nick says:

    Robert Newman and Joseph Atwill have done some interesting research on this, their conclusions are different. I can’t summarise, you will have to seek out their material, but easiest way is if you are a redice member

  3. Jennifer says:

    I’m afraid I studied Elizabethan drama quite seriously at one time, and was certain it was the ‘Swan of Avon’ who wrote the plays. But as you’ve just seen Hamlet, Tap, you may recall the ‘What a piece of work is man’ speech – which sounds very similar to the Neoplatonist Pico Della Mirandola’s ‘Oration on the Dignity of Man’. This is very advanced Hermetic philosophy for a humble actor.
    And there again in The Taming of the Shrew, there is clear knowledge of trauma-based mind control, such as would have been used by the elites in their ‘Imperial Conditioning’. Again not something that be commonly known around the South Bank. Yes, he was in the King’s Company of actors, but that only means he was essentially a servant.
    And the Sonnets were clearly written by a nobleman. It’s got to be Sir Francis Bacon.
    Only you can’t say that around here, because there’s too much business invested in the town, and in academia, – and I used to work at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre!

  4. Dogman says:

    I’m with you on this Jennifer.
    Of fifty-three points of style selected by Mr. Cowden Clarke as being ” characteristic” of Shakespeare, all have been found in the prose works by Bacon.

    “Good dawning” entered in Bacon’s note book circa 1596 has since appeared but once in English print viz. in “King Lear” first published 1608.

    Shakespeare: “Many men that stumble at the threshold”
    Bacon : “To stumble at the threshold”

    Shak.: “Thought is free”
    Bac.: “Thought is free”

    Shak.:”He will fence with his own shadow”
    Bac.: “To fight with a shadow”

    Shak.: “What’s done cannot be undone”
    Bac.: Things done cannot be undone”

    Shak.: “Loan oft loses both itself and friend”
    Bac.: “He who loans to a friend loses double”

    Shak.: “Plucking the grass to know where sits the wind”
    Bac.: “We usually try which way the wind bloweth by casting up grass”

    Shak.: “Sense sure you have, else could you not have motion”
    Bac.: The ancients could not conceive how there can be motion without sense”

    Shak.: “The ill wind which blows no man to good”
    Bac.: “An ill wind that bloweth no man to good”

    Shak.: “Call me not fool, till Heaven hath sent me good fortune.”
    Bac.: “God sendeth fortune to fools.”

    These are only a few suggested brevities: there are hundreds more. There is scarcely a sentiment or opinion expressed in the plays which has not its counterpart in the acknowledged works of Bacon.
    “Both authors” call the sun by the exceptional name of Titan.
    The earliest work attributed to the Stratford butcher-boy is dedicated to the Earl of Southampton, one of Bacon’s friends. Comment is superfluous.
    The great folio published in 1623 was dedicated to the Earls of Pembroke and Montgomery, again Bacon’s intimates. Surely dedication demands some preliminary courtesy, and Shakespeare had been dead seven years?

    This site is worth a visit – http://sirbacon.org/

  5. Scotty says:

    Shakespeare was an illiterate actor.

    Bacon called him the ‘detestable weed’.

    Shakespeare’s daughter was also illiterate. When she married, she had to sign with an X.

    All ‘Shakespeare’s works’ were, most likely, written by Francis Bacon and a large team of writers, poets and artists he employed to work at his Scriptorium at Twickenham, on the Thames.

  6. Scotty says:

    This film can be found and watched for free on YT. It contains much about the Shakespeare myth.

    http://www.adullamfilms.com/SecretMysteries.html

  7. Dogman says:

    Judging by his signatures, he must have used a typewriter! :)https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d1/Shakespeare_sigs_collected.png

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