UK schoolkids to have brains crammed from 5 years old

New testing regime to be imposed on British schoolchildren

British Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has announced a consultation paper on proposals for a new testing regime for five- and eleven-year-olds in England.
The new consultation detailed by the Liberal Democrat leader follows the announcement this June of the new curriculum to be implemented from September 2014. The tests are designed to ensure that the rote learning, memorisation of spelling lists and times tables by heart and emphasis on “facts and rules” approach to teaching is enshrined from the moment a child starts primary school.
Early years and preschool teachers are told that their sole role is to make young children “school ready”, while primary teachers have the task of ensuring that 11-year-olds are “secondary school ready”.
Behind these empty, meaningless and deeply uninspiring phrases lay plans to rip the heart out of childhood teaching. All positive and progressive approaches to teaching based on producing well-rounded children who are able to respond critically to the world around them, develop problem-solving skills, independence and emotional well-being—already severely undermined over the past two decades—are to be ruled out.
Following the announcement of the consultation, Clegg was widely denounced by teachers, the teaching unions and some press as seeking to turn schools into “exam sausage factories”.
http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/07/30/test-j30.html

 Anonymous said…
School isn’t about learning anything anymore, it’s about indoctrination and turning 
children into mindless zombies that can barely think for themselves.

Home-schooling is the only way to go imo.

10:26 am

 Delete

Blogger Tapestry said…

If that’s the case, why are they tampering with the primary system? 
In fact primary in the UK is still pretty good overall. A cultural triumph given 
all the interference. As regards secondary education on the other hand, 
I’m right with you. Get the hell out of there.

Anonymous said…
As a parent of a child with mild SEN, and a former teaching assistant, I have to take issue with the notion that primary schooling in the UK is pretty good overall. If you have a child with no social or academic difficulties, who is a round peg for the round hole provided, then this may well be so. Any child with ‘differences’ from the expected average is at the mercy of a system that exists to foster uniformity. SEN provision is woefully underfunded, frequently absent altogether or not fit for purpose, or has to be fought for tooth and nail by desperate parents. Sometimes provision is solely aimed at making things easier for the school, not meeting the needs of the child. Even for children with no SEN, trying to get bullying issues sorted out can result in the family coming up against a relentless brick wall of backside-covering. “Thanks to our excellent anti-bullying policy we don’t have bullying at our school” is often used as an excuse to do squat. Primary schooling in the UK may still be more benign than secondary schooling on the whole, but for many children it is still a deeply unhappy, demoralising, miserable experience.
The Tap Blog is a collective of like-minded researchers and writers who’ve joined forces to distribute information and voice opinions avoided by the world’s media.
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

3 Responses to “UK schoolkids to have brains crammed from 5 years old”

  1. Anonymous says:

    School isn’t about learning anything anymore, it’s about indoctrination and turning children into mindless zombies that can barely think for themselves.

    Home-schooling is the only way to go imo.

  2. Tapestry says:

    If that’s the case, why are they tampering with the primary system? In fact primary in the UK is still pretty good overall. A cultural triumph given all the interference. As regards secondary education on the other hand, I’m right with you. Get the hell out of there.

  3. Anonymous says:

    As a parent of a child with mild SEN, and a former teaching assistant, I have to take issue with the notion that primary schooling in the UK is pretty good overall. If you have a child with no social or academic difficulties, who is a round peg for the round hole provided, then this may well be so. Any child with ‘differences’ from the expected average is at the mercy of a system that exists to foster uniformity. SEN provision is woefully underfunded, frequently absent altogether or not fit for purpose, or has to be fought for tooth and nail by desperate parents. Sometimes provision is solely aimed at making things easier for the school, not meeting the needs of the child. Even for children with no SEN, trying to get bullying issues sorted out can result in the family coming up against a relentless brick wall of backside-covering. “Thanks to our excellent anti-bullying policy we don’t have bullying at our school” is often used as an excuse to do squat. Primary schooling in the UK may still be more benign than secondary schooling on the whole, but for many children it is still a deeply unhappy, demoralising, miserable experience.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.