Fertilisers and weed-killers are not needed

COMMENT –  Anonymous said…

i don’t know about the music thing but i do know that aerated compost tea is nothing short of miraculous. there are many youtube videos showing how to make it, definitely worth a look people. 
it’s free (apart from the molasses and fish tank pump). i never had such a healthy abundant garden before using aerated compost tea. deserts can become fertile with this stuff and no skanky chemical corporation profits from it. careful though, compost tea has a cult following and people get very excited when they realise what it does. one guy in alaska grows his pumpkins until they’re the size of a small car before before he picks them.
POST

Research scientist Dr. Elaine Ingham1 is internationally recognized as an expert on the benefits of sustainable soil science.
She was formerly an associate professor at Oregon State University and well on her way to full-tenure professorship when her research on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) led to her being forced to resign.
The biotech industry, led by Monsanto, funds a large part of the budget for Oregon State University, and her findings were not welcome as it threatened the University’s funding.
Dr. Ingham went on to develop a company called Soil Foodweb Inc., which helps farmers and gardeners understand the health of their soil. The company analyzes soil samples and also helps develop a composting plan that is specifically targeted for the plants you’re seeking to grow.
Helping Farmers and Gardeners Take Back Control of Their Soil Health
Just how is plant growth affected by the health of the soil? The key lies in having the right helper organisms; beneficial species of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, beneficial nematodes (not the weedfeeders), microarthropods, and earthworms—all of which contribute to plant growth in a number of different ways.
“If we get a problem like around the root systems, around the surfaces, above ground – the seed, the leaves, or the branches of the plant – these organisms will prevent diseases from being able to even find the plant,”she explains. “The pests won’t locate the plant. So, disease suppression, pest suppression, and all of those things are part of what the life in the soil does for your plant.”
Nutrient cycling is another major issue. According to Dr. Ingham, there’s no soil on Earth that lacks the nutrients to grow a plant. She believes the concept that your soil is deficient and needs added phosphorous or nitrogen etc in order to grow plants is flawed, and largely orchestrated by the chemical companies, because it’s based on looking at the soluble, inorganic nutrients that are partly present in your soil.

The real nutrition your plants require is derived from microorganisms in the soil.

These organisms take the mineral material that’s in your soil and convert it into a plant-available form.

Without these bioorganisms, your plants cannot get the nutrients they need. So what you need is not more chemical soil additives, what you need is the proper balance of beneficial soil organisms. According to Dr. Ingham:
“It’s very necessary to have these organisms. They will supply your plant with precisely the right balances of all the nutrients as the plant requires. When you start to realize that one of the major roles and functions of life in the soil is to provide nutrients to the plants in the proper forms, then we don’t need inorganic fertilizers. We certainly don’t have to have genetically engineered plants or to utilize inorganic fertilizers if we get this proper biology back in the soil.
If we balance the proper biology, we select against the growth of weeds, so the whole issue with herbicides is done away with. We don’t need the herbicides if we can get the proper life back into the soil and select for the growth of the plants that we want to grow and against the growth of the weedy species.”

The Science of Ideal Microbial Balance for Plants

The science of establishing the ideal microbes for a specific plant is already well-established. Reference material on how to identify what those ideal bacterial, fungal, protozoan, nematode, and microarthropod communities are can be found in Dr. Inham’s books, which include:
  • 10 Steps to Gardening with Nature
  • Soil Biology Primer (co-authored with Andrew R. Moldenke and Clive A. Edwards)
  • The Field Guide for Actively Aerated Compost Tea (AACT)
  • Compost Tea Quality: Light Microscope Methods
  • The Compost Tea Brewing Manual
The first book, 10 Steps to Gardening with Nature, reviews many of these soil communities and explains the mechanisms behind how these life forms in the soil benefit your plants. You can also find valuable information and resources on the Rodale Institute’s website.2 Once you’ve identified the optimal communities of soil organism, you can then modify your compost to correct any imbalances. For example:
“Woody materials – saw dust, paper, cardboard, wood chips, and dry ground leaves that fell from the trees at the end of the growing season – are going to grow fungi. You choose whether you need more fungal or more bacterial. And then design your recipe for your compost according to what is missing in your soil, so you can put back in what is not there,”she explains.

Dr Mercola 

PLUS HETT sends to The Tap

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/10004652/Black-Sabbath-helps-plants-to-grow-but-Sir-Cliff-Richard-kills-them.html

Black Sabbath helps plants to grow but Sir Cliff Richard ‘kills them’

Playing a constant diet of heavy metal music helps plants to bloom, it appears, but beware the crooning of Sir Cliff Richard.

Chris Beardshaw: Gardeners’ Question Time

Gardening expert Chris Beardshaw Photo: MARTIN POPE
7:00AM BST 19 Apr 2013
For one of Britain’s leading gardeners has said playing a catalogue of Sir Cliff’s greatest hits to plants could in fact kill them off.
Chris Beardshaw, from Gardeners’ Question Time, claimed different genres of music would encourage plants to grow at different rates, with songs by Black Sabbath helping them to bloom.
But, in an experiment conducted by his horticultural students, plants played the collected works of Sir Cliff “all died”.
The experiment, where alstroemerias were treated to four different styles of music, found that plants surrounded by classical scores grew slightly shorter than those in silence, but were “slightly more floriferous and there was slightly less pest and disease”.
Beardshaw, who also appears on Gardeners’ World, added explosing others to Sir Cliff Richard had been a total disaster, killing off all plants involved.
The Tap Blog is a collective of like-minded researchers and writers who’ve joined forces to distribute information and voice opinions avoided by the world’s media.
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3 Responses to “Fertilisers and weed-killers are not needed”

  1. Anonymous says:

    i don’t know about the music thing but i do know that aerated compost tea is nothing short of miraculous. there are many youtube videos showing how to make it, definitely worth a look people. it’s free (apart from the molasses and fish tank pump). i never had such a healthy abundant garden before using aerated compost tea. deserts can become fertile with this stuff and no skanky chemical corporation profits from it. careful though, compost tea has a cult following and people get very excited when they realise what it does. one guy in alaska grows his pumpkins until they’re the size of a small car before before he picks them.

  2. Otto Weaver says:

    Composting is a great way to recycling your current biodegradable waste materials. Rather than losing your current kitchen waste in addition to backyard waste materials for being sent to the landfill exactly where it will advantage nobody, you may input it in the can that you just designed with
    Compost tea recipe in addition to make it possible for our mother earth be able to work on creating your personal free of charge fertilizer. Obviously, this is often a good big bucks saver for the devoted garden enthusiast.

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