Education doesn’t need teachers

TAP –  Gatto says that ‘childish people are much easier to manage than critically trained self reliant ones’.  That is the philosophy that underlies today’s educational curriculums of governments.  Education has been designed to make people dependent on others, unable to believe their own thoughts and ideas can be better than those of ‘experts’ and ‘professionals’.  The purpose is to crush development, not to foster it.  The video at the end gives it to you in seven minutes.

The natural curiosity of children will lead them to much higher levels of skill and knowledge than classroom drills, which stamp out self-motivation.  Allowing children freedom to choose their own agenda ensures 100% motivation, and prevents emotional/intellectual dependence on the teacher.  Most kids are never allowed or encouraged to use their own minds at any time during their childhood by schools.

Julia said…
I came across John Taylor Gatto a long time before discovering the conspiracy. I have worked in schools, primary and secondary in various roles, and was already thinking along the same lines myself. This article is about the 7 lessons he teaches in school. It’s not that long, but sums it up.

http://www.wanderings.net/notebook/Main/SevenLessonsTaughtInSchool

QUOTATION –

“Education would be much more  effective if its purpose was to ensure that by the
time they leave school every  boy and girl should know how much they do not know,
and be imbued with a  lifelong
desire to know it.” –  William Haley, British Editor

TAP – Its purpose is to fill your head with wrong information, and stop you questioning it.

John Taylor Gatto

John Taylor Gatto (born December 15, 1935) is a retired American school teacher with nearly 30 years experience in the classroom, and author of several books on education. He is an activist critical of compulsory schooling, of the perceived divide between the teen years and adulthood, and of what he characterizes as the hegemonic nature of discourse on education and the education professions.

Gatto was born in the Pittsburgh-area steel town of Monongahela, Pennsylvania. In his youth he attended public schools throughout the Pittsburgh Metro Area including Swissvale, Monongahela, and Uniontown as well as a Catholic boarding school in Latrobe. He did undergraduate work at Cornell, the University of Pittsburgh, and Columbia, then served in the U.S. Army medical corps at Fort Knox, Kentucky, and Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Following army service he did graduate work at the City University of New York, Hunter College, Yeshiva University, the University of California, and Cornell.

He worked as a writer and held several odd jobs before borrowing his roommate’s license to investigate teaching. Gatto also ran for the New York State Senate, 29th District in 1985 and 

1988 as a member of the Conservative Party of New York against incumbent David Paterson. He was named New York City Teacher of the Year in 1989, 1990, and 1991, and New York State Teacher of the Year in 1991. In 1991, he wrote a letter announcing his retirement, titled I Quit, I Think, to the op-ed pages of the Wall Street Journal, saying that he no longer wished to “hurt kids to make a living.” He then began a public speaking and writing career, and has received several awards from libertarian organizations, including the Alexis de Tocqueville Award for Excellence in Advancement of Educational Freedom in 1997.

He promotes homeschooling, and specifically unschooling. Wade A. Carpenter, associate professor of education at Berry College, has called his books “scathing” and “one-sided and hyperbolic, [but] not inaccurate” and describes himself as in agreement with Gatto.

Gatto is currently working on a 3-part documentary about compulsory schooling, titled The Fourth Purpose. He says he was inspired by Ken Burns’s Civil War.

What does the school do with the children? Gatto states the following assertions in “Dumbing Us Down”:

It makes the children confused. It presents an incoherent ensemble of information that the child needs to memorize to stay in school. Apart from the tests and trials that programming is similar to the television, it fills almost all the “free” time of children. One sees and hears something, only to forget it again.

It teaches them to accept their class affiliation.
It makes them indifferent.
It makes them emotionally dependent.
It makes them intellectually dependent.
It teaches them a kind of self-confidence that requires constant confirmation by experts (provisional self-esteem).
It makes it clear to them that they cannot hide, because they are always supervised


The Tap Blog is a collective of like-minded researchers and writers who’ve joined forces to distribute information and voice opinions avoided by the world’s media.
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One Response to “Education doesn’t need teachers”

  1. Julia says:

    I came across John Taylor Gatto a long time before discovering the conspiracy. I have worked in schools, primary and secondary in various roles, and was already thinking along the same lines myself. This article is about the 7 lessons he teaches in school. It’s not that long, but sums it up. http://www.wanderings.net/notebook/Main/SevenLessonsTaughtInSchool

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