BT lets the side down

I blogged the story of my company’s order of a leased line to provide a 10 mbps broadband link.  We contracted in May, and were told 75 days would be the time it would take to complete.  That was 110 days ago.

Not only has there been no progress.  BT are unwilling to provide any information as to when they will be starting work on the job.  Or even if they will be starting work on the job.

There was a report in the local newspaper the Shropshire Star, which focused on the cost of the contract which seemed somewhat high at £57,000, and failed to mention the real story o the total failure of BT to either complete, or even communicate,.

Owen Paterson the new Environment secretary is making friendly noises to our cause.  The Shropshire Star say they will rerun the story, but what else can we do?  BT, it appears, has the power to prevent anyone they like from getting fast broadband, and no one says a dickie bird.

Except me that is.  I say things.

Julia adds –

Despite the appearance of choice in the telecoms industry, BT still seems to control everything and charge what they like too. I have just moved house. There was already a physical phone line there. Surely they just have to enter some numbers in a computer, which can be done by a call centre person. But no, it costs £50 and requires an engineer and takes 5 weeks. I don’t go through BT, but unfortunately my supplier has to anyway. It’s called OpenReach, but is part of BT. I got a text telling me good news, the line will just work now, no need for an engineer to visit after all! Well that seemed pretty obvious to me from the beginning. 
It’s all about control. No doubt all the best technology is being carefully blocked. 

The Tap Blog is a collective of like-minded researchers and writers who’ve joined forces to distribute information and voice opinions avoided by the world’s media.
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9 Responses to “BT lets the side down”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Sue for Breach of Contract.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Who have you spoken to at BT? Underlings or higher-ups?

    Pressuring higher-ups (esp. if they have messed up their contractual obligations) may yield results?

    MPs are useless in the main, but you sometimes get lucky.

  3. Tapestry says:

    BT won’t dirty their hands by contracting directly with privately owned businesses. They use intermediaries. In this case Talktalk.

    The contract stated 75 days as the delivery time, but now they state that this was only a guide and that there is no date at all by which they have to install the link. It could even be two years.

    Is this what Ed Vaizey calls the most competitive broadband market in Europe? It is entirely monopolistic and needs smashing to pieces.

  4. horehound says:

    Broadband in this country is a joke , whether you believe it to be conspiracy or cock up for a country of small area / high population we should have some of the fastest internet access on earth.
    An interesting point about internet access most people don’t know ( and one you may be interested in tap) is that you can actually access/ build a broadband network over power lines ie- if you have a plug socket in your home connected to a national grid (99%+ of the population) it could be used as internet access,its a very simple/old and inexpensive tech (power companies use a version of it to pay a ‘feed in tarriff’ if you have taxpayer subsidized solar panels on your roof), google ‘broadband over power line’s’ for basic details.
    In the late 90’s when the discussion over broadband / dial up speeds really kicked off I remember even the MSM occasionally discussing the use of this technology for the broadband future (particularly the tech column in the Daily Mirror) then nothing.Its almost unbelievable that here we are in 2012 ( nearly 15 years later!) still discussing the slow speeds of FUTURE broadband.

  5. Julia says:

    Despite the appearance of choice in the telecoms industry, BT still seems to control everything and charge what they like too. I have just moved house. There was already a physical phone line there. Surely they just have to enter some numbers in a computer, which can be done by a call centre person. But no, it costs £50 and requires an engineer and takes 5 weeks. I don’t go through BT, but unfortunately my supplier has to anyway. It’s called OpenReach, but is part of BT. I got a text telling me good news, the line will just work now, no need for an engineer to visit after all! Well that seemed pretty obvious to me from the beginning.
    It’s all about control. No doubt all the best technology is being carefully blocked.

  6. Twig says:

    @Tapestry
    You should lodge a complaint with OFCOM.

  7. Tapestry says:

    We are considering that, but are advised it could add to the delay and not reduce it.

  8. Twig says:

    @Tapestry
    Why would it delay the job?
    Is it a form of blackmail?

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