Shop Local. Get Out Of The Supermarket.

Scotty writes

There are some currency alternatives available now.

Bitcoin:

http://bitcoin.org/

Brixton Pound:

http://brixtonpound.org/what/

The thing to remember is that every time we use corporation shops i.e. supermarkets, chain stores – any business that is not small-scale and owned and run by local people, any profit is being sucked straight out of the community.

The money shoppers used to spend with locally, privately owned small businesses, circulated within that community.

Corporations have been extracting profit with every transaction. This profit is now sent off-shore. Very little, if any, tax is paid.

Communities are impoverished literally with EVERY transaction.

Every visit to a shopping centre or supermarket means that we are all collectively poorer.

Here’s a thought. As corporations pay little or no tax and also actually RECEIVE PAYMENTS FROM THE TAXPAYER – could this this mean that we, as individual citizens, are paying more tax annually than corporations?

Do I pay more tax than M&S or Boots PLC etc? I am certainly not a tax expert – does anyone know any more?

The Tap Blog is a collective of like-minded researchers and writers who’ve joined forces to distribute information and voice opinions avoided by the world’s media.
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One Response to “Shop Local. Get Out Of The Supermarket.”

  1. Julia says:

    Good news is that local shops around me that are independently run without stupid hierarchies and corporate control are doing very very well, despite the new Sainsbury’s up the road. It is on my list of Signs That Things Are Changing For The Better. More people seem to like the stability and friendliness and community offered by local businesses. Personally I think it works out cheaper if you take every thing into account, and not just the price of milk on a special offer Tuesday. Another interesting thing my local pub landlady told me is that people don’t book tables any more. Apparently this trend is happening elsewhere too. Looks like more spontaneity, more risk. Less planning, less rigidity.

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